Kristin and Owen YMCA at Mt ST Helen’s

This is the side of the Lodge.   I haven’t finished putting the roofing tiles or the wood work around he windows on yet. The wood work around the windows will outline the tinfoil and divide it up in small rectangles.

I will get the description up before 6 or so this evening.

 

Kristin

The Main Lodge at the YMCA Camp Meehan on Mt. St. Helens
This building served as the camps kitchen and dining hall for 75 to 100 campers and staff. It was heated by the river rock fire place that burned readily available wood that was chopped by the campers. Teh building’s electricity source came from a generator that was powered from a Pelton Water Wheel in the river just up the mountain. All the supplies and food that was served there was driven up the mountain road to the road’s end where it was transfered into a boat and transported across the lake to the lodge. In addition to dining the lodge was also used as a special events venue and dance hall for the campers. Campers fondly remember Miner’s night and disco competitions. The building and the entire camp was destroyed in the eruption of Mt. St. Helens on May 18, 1980.

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Portland’s Brew History (Julia Kirkpatrick and Chloè Womack

Portland’s First Brewery:

Artists Chloè Womack and Julia Kirkpatrick have recreated the historic Weinhard Brewery Complex on West Burnside. Weinhard was one of Portland’s first brewers. After immigrating to Portland from Germany in 1856, Weinhard opened the Weinhard brewing complex in 1864. Nowadays the building is home to Henry’s Tavern and Porland is known as a mecca for beer lovers. While Portland’s beer history is rooted in Henry Weinhard and the historic brewery, it’s present and future are centered around craft brewing– small scale batches. In front of the building are the steps to making beer, and as a handout is a list of local Portland craft breweries, stores, bars, and homebrewing supply outlets to further Portland’s beer culture.

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Edgefield Manor

 

In the days before social assistance poor farms or poor houses were often set up by local governments to house not only impoverished citizens but the elderly, the disabled, and the mentally-challenged.  The stately Georgian-revival style Edgefield Manor was built in 1911 and served as the location of the Multnomah County Poor Farm for several decades. The land was a completely self-sufficient environment where residents raised hogs, poultry, grew fruits and vegetables and operated a dairy, a cannery and a meat packing plant. The farm also housed a sanatorium for the many residents who were frail and/or ill. Deaths were frequent and most of the deceased were buried in unmarked plots.

In 1962, the facility was given its current name and used as a nursing home until 1982, at which point it was closed and condemned. In 1990, the McMenamins brothers bought the land and slowly transformed it into a European-esque village offering lodging, a pub, a movie theater, a spa, a winery, a brewery, distillery, golf courses, vineyards, and extensive gardens. Edgefield is located in Troutdale, about fifteen minutes east of Portland.

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Columbus Day Windstorm

On Columbus Day 1962, the remnants of Typhoon Freda whipped through the West Coast, engaging one of the most violent windstorms ever exerienced in the area. Killing 38 people and destroying more trees than the Mt. St. Helen eruption, this wicked storm created over $200 million worth of damage within 12 hours, causing power outages for weeks. Peak windgusts of 127 mph took shape in Corvallis, 116 mph at the Morrison Bridge in Portland, and 138 mph winds at Newport before the anemometer was decimated. Coinciding with Columbus Day, a strange reaction to the celebration of our pilgramage swept through the states…

The Campbell Hall Tower
This is a picture was taken by a student photographer at the Oregon College of Education in Monmouth
(now Western Oregon University)

Reproduced by Evan & Mikaela

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Dignity Village (Justin and Jacquie)

Dignity Village is a formally a tent city that was founded  by homeless people and now provides a safe, drug and alcohol free, alternative to the streets for 60 homeless adults every night. In addition to private temporary dwellings, the Village provides basic services including toilets, showers, cooking facilities, telephone, mail, computer access, and access to health care.

After moving the tent city around  due to legal technicalities the City of Portland agreed to let the group camp in a city lot called Sunderland Yard, 7 miles from downtown. They are protected in this location until 2010, and here have homes made out of straw and mud, wood, and other salvaged materials.

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St. Johns Bridges The Historical Gap

The St. Johns Bridge from the Linnton (west) side of the Willamette River

 

The St. Johns bridge has spanned the gap between St. Johns and Linnton for over 78 years. Spanning over 1,200 ft and reaching a height of 408 ft, the massive bridge is often identified by its Gothic spires and green color (originally city officials wanted it painted with yellow and black stripes, but the designers waited until St. Patrick’s Day 1931 to announce the bridge’s final color). After a vaudevillian lobbying campaign, the bridge project received funding and began construction just one month before the Stock Market Crash in 1929. Through the early years of the Great Depression, construction on the bridge provided many area laborers with steady work. Dedicated during the 1931 Rose Festival, the bridge broke records for highest clearance in the nation and was the first to apply aviation clearance lights to its towers. Today, the St. Johns bridge remains the tallest bridge in Portland and the only suspension bridge in the Willamette Valley.

-Sam Korman & Delphine Bedient

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The Native American plank house

The plank house was built by Native Americans on the west coast of  the United States. They were built by planks taken from the giant cedar trees. The Native Americans used sustainable ways to collect the planks by only removing planks from the trees, leaving the tree to grow and get bigger. After the settlers came from the east the  giant trees became scarce because they cut down the whole tree. Later the logging industry made the trees scarce.

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